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Lemon Law Blog

Tuesday, August 25, 2015

Experts Combat Auto Industry’s Promise that "It's Normal" for Vehicles to Consume Excess Oil Between Changes


My manufacturer is telling me it is typical for my vehicle to consume excess oil between changes. Is this true?

Manufacturers and automotive experts alike have long since touted the proverbial 3,000-mile rule when it comes to the frequency of oil changes. For some models, drivers can get away with a 7,000- or 10,000-mile interval between changes – particularly if the model is newer and installed with an oil-efficient engine.

What is not normal, however, are the latest assertions by auto manufacturers that burning oil before the 3,000-mile mark is not considered a defect, and drivers should be prepared to top off their engines between changes. Unbelievably, drivers across the nation are receiving this answer from manufacturers when they bring in their new vehicles for service – and are rightfully demanding a second opinion on the issue.
Read more . . .


Wednesday, August 19, 2015

Ford Takes Another Hit With Widespread 2013 Fiesta Complaints


What are the options for Ford Fiesta owners experiencing transmission problems?

Under the Lemon Laws of both New York and New Jersey, consumers having recently purchased a problematic new vehicle may be able to seek damages and replacement costs directly from the manufacturer. They may also, in many cases, be able to retrieve attorneys’ fees and incidental damages. These laws, which help to supplement applicable consumer protection laws, are designed to protect purchasers from dishonesty should a manufacturer refuse to acknowledge known problems with its product. As many Lemon Law clients can attest, these laws also protect against placement of dangerous and deadly vehicles on the roadways, as is the case in the most recent transmission-related issue plaguing Ford due to its defective late model Fiesta product.

For one Pennsylvania couple, their Ford Fiesta has been nothing but trouble since they originally purchased it new in 2013.
Read more . . .


Monday, August 3, 2015

NJ Audi & VW Dealerships Accused of Lemon Law Violations


What kind of activity by a dealership could give rise to a New Jersey Lemon Law violation? 


The New Jersey Lemon Law is designed to protect consumers from the unnecessary and inflated costs of constant vehicle repairs for a brand new automobile. In order to qualify for coverage under the law, a consumer must prove the following factors to be true: 
• The vehicle was purchased or registered in New Jersey;
• The vehicle must be less than two years old, or have less than 24,000 miles – whichever comes first;
• The consumer has taken the vehicle for an unreasonable number of repairs; and
• The problems substantially impact the use or safety of the vehicle.
When the above factors are met, a Lemon Law attorney can help the consumer pursue not only a refund of the price of the vehicle, but comprehensive damages to compensate for repairs, rental expenses, and any other costs incidental to the situation. 

Under the Lemon Law, manufacturers are required to work with the consumer to try and rectify problems as quickly and efficiently as possible. In addition, New Jersey’s consumer protection laws also prevent dealerships from engaging in unscrupulous practices against car buyers.
Read more . . .


Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Class Action Against Ford Alleges Harmful Carbon Monoxide Exposure; Lemon Laws Included


What is the status of ongoing litigation against car manufacturers in the U.S.? 

Carbon monoxide carries the dual-risk of being not only one of the most fatal gases to humans, but also one of the most undetectable. Accordingly, several New Jersey plaintiffs have launched a putative class action lawsuit against the Ford Motor Company following the detection of the gas within the vehicle while driving – an allegation the company has vehemently denied publicly, yet allegedly admitted to in private depositions. 

The Read more . . .


Monday, July 13, 2015

Attorney Timothy Abeel Wins Lemon Law Case Against Toyota


What are my options if a brand new vehicle is emitting an odd odor from the air vents? 


At Timothy Abeel and Associates, we work tirelessly on behalf of our clients – no matter how many times the manufacturer insists nothing is wrong. As experienced practitioners of Lemon Law cases, we have fine-tuned our practice to offer the area’s leading representation against manufacturers that refuse to correct defects in their automobiles, as was the case in one of our recent victories against Toyota Motor Sales. If you are experiencing a situation to that described below, be sure to contact our office right away for help in recovering the costs of repairing your vehicle. 

Attorney Abeel demands compensation from obstinate manufacturer 

Prior to our recent victory versus Toyota, the plaintiff in the case was experiencing a noxious and sickening odor emitting from the air vents of her new car. According to the allegations, the odor was so overwhelming that it caused headaches and nausea for all passengers – including several young children.
Read more . . .


Monday, June 22, 2015

4 Reasons Why You Need a Lemon Law Attorney


My new car is acting up already. Should I contact a lawyer, or just take it back to the dealer? 


In Pennsylvania and New Jersey, new car owners are protected from ‘lemons’ under the states’ applicable Lemon Laws. These laws are designed to ensure both domestic and foreign manufacturers are adhering to proper protocol and – most importantly – protecting consumers from unsafe and defective machines. 

If you recently purchased a new automobile in Pennsylvania or New Jersey, and are already experiencing an issue, you need a Lemon Law attorney for the following reasons: 

#4: Free Mechanical Evaluation: In keeping with its best interests, a dealership or manufacturer will often try to “sweet talk” a new car owner into believing the malfunction or issue is minor, nonexistent, or will not be problematic. This leaves the buyer in a difficult situation, left to decide whether to take this advice at face value or spend hundreds of dollars for a second opinion from a mechanic.
Read more . . .


Wednesday, June 3, 2015

High Number of Vehicle Recalls Since 2014


How do I know if my car has been recalled?

The number of car recalls for repairs in the United States since 2014 stands at almost 100 million. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates almost 74.2 million recalls occurred in 2014. Recall industry experts estimate almost 25 million recalls for 2015.
Read more . . .


Monday, June 1, 2015

Ford Recalls Almost 593,000 Vehicles


Why is Ford recalling close to 593,000 vehicles?

Ford has announced that they are recalling half a million vehicles.  While the reasons for the recalls vary, the overwhelming problem involves the power assist to the steering, making the vehicle more difficult to turn.
Read more . . .


Monday, June 1, 2015

Couple Seeks Justice After Purchase of Ford Fiesta


What should people do if they buy a lemon?

Kristine Kovacs of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania is at her wits end with the Ford Motor Company.  Soon after she purchased her brand new Ford Fiesta in October of 2013, she and her husband repeatedly returned to the dealership due to transmission problems.
Read more . . .


Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Takata air bag recall

Japan's Takata Corporation has finally conceded, after a decade, that its airbags are defective, and has recalled almost 34 million vehicles - that's 1 in 7 vehicles on American roadways.

Six deaths and 100 injuries have been linked to the problem of exploding airbags.

Unfortunately this massive recall puts consumers in a very dangerous position and an alarming waiting game.

Takata has to make 33.8 million replacement parts, and at current production rates, it would take about 2 1/2 years for Takata to do that on its own. And as we learned today, even getting confirmation on whether your car is impacted isn't easy.

Under this historic recall are many Hondas, but also vehicles from ten other top automakers.

Could yours be one of them?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has set up Safercar.gov so you can put in your VIN to see if your car's under the recall. But the agency says the site won't be fully up and running until next week!

The VINs have to come from the carmakers, and NHTSA doesn't even have most of the numbers from them yet.

Consumer Lemon Law attorney Timothy Abeel says, "Consumers should first call their dealership to see whether their vehicle is subject to that recall."

Action News tried calling and live chatting with a few local dealerships today. During our live chats, and at least one phone call, we were told someone from the service departments would get back to us, but we're still waiting for those calls.

One service representative at a local Toyota dealership confirmed that the dealership doesn't have repair or replacements parts, and he told me this recall has been "overblown by the media!"

The advice here? Keep on calling until you get someone willing to help you. And until your airbag is fixed or replaced, ask for a rental.

Abeel says, "The consumer should absolutely demand for the loaner car."

Experts we talked to today say whether to disable defective airbags is a question for your dealer or automaker.

There are a couple things that could help speed up the process of getting replacement parts.

Honda, Takata's largest customer, has lined up other companies to make replacement inflators. And Takata now says it is also working with other suppliers.

It also tells us today it has made 3.8-million replacement inflators so far - just a fraction of the nearly 34 million that are needed.

Read More.

Japan's Takata Corporation has finally conceded, after a decade, that its airbags are defective, and has recalled almost 34 million vehicles - that's 1 in 7 vehicles on American roadways.

Six deaths and 100 injuries have been linked to the problem of exploding airbags.

Unfortunately this massive recall puts consumers in a very dangerous position and an alarming waiting game.

Takata has to make 33.8 million replacement parts, and at current production rates, it would take about 2 1/2 years for Takata to do that on its own. And as we learned today, even getting confirmation on whether your car is impacted isn't easy.

Under this historic recall are many Hondas, but also vehicles from ten other top automakers.

Could yours be one of them?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has set up Safercar.gov so you can put in your VIN to see if your car's under the recall. But the agency says the site won't be fully up and running until next week!

The VINs have to come from the carmakers, and NHTSA doesn't even have most of the numbers from them yet.

Consumer Lemon Law attorney Timothy Abeel says, "Consumers should first call their dealership to see whether their vehicle is subject to that recall."

Action News tried calling and live chatting with a few local dealerships today. During our live chats, and at least one phone call, we were told someone from the service departments would get back to us, but we're still waiting for those calls.

One service representative at a local Toyota dealership confirmed that the dealership doesn't have repair or replacements parts, and he told me this recall has been "overblown by the media!"

The advice here? Keep on calling until you get someone willing to help you. And until your airbag is fixed or replaced, ask for a rental.

Abeel says, "The consumer should absolutely demand for the loaner car."

Experts we talked to today say whether to disable defective airbags is a question for your dealer or automaker.

There are a couple things that could help speed up the process of getting replacement parts.

Honda, Takata's largest customer, has lined up other companies to make replacement inflators. And Takata now says it is also working with other suppliers.

It also tells us today it has made 3.8-million replacement inflators so far - just a fraction of the nearly 34 million that are needed.
Japan's Takata Corporation has finally conceded, after a decade, that its airbags are defective, and has recalled almost 34 million vehicles - that's 1 in 7 vehicles on American roadways.

Six deaths and 100 injuries have been linked to the problem of exploding airbags.

Unfortunately this massive recall puts consumers in a very dangerous position and an alarming waiting game.

Takata has to make 33.8 million replacement parts, and at current production rates, it would take about 2 1/2 years for Takata to do that on its own. And as we learned today, even getting confirmation on whether your car is impacted isn't easy.

Under this historic recall are many Hondas, but also vehicles from ten other top automakers.

Could yours be one of them?

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has set up Safercar.gov so you can put in your VIN to see if your car's under the recall. But the agency says the site won't be fully up and running until next week!

The VINs have to come from the carmakers, and NHTSA doesn't even have most of the numbers from them yet.

Consumer Lemon Law attorney Timothy Abeel says, "Consumers should first call their dealership to see whether their vehicle is subject to that recall."

Action News tried calling and live chatting with a few local dealerships today. During our live chats, and at least one phone call, we were told someone from the service departments would get back to us, but we're still waiting for those calls.

One service representative at a local Toyota dealership confirmed that the dealership doesn't have repair or replacements parts, and he told me this recall has been "overblown by the media!"

The advice here? Keep on calling until you get someone willing to help you. And until your airbag is fixed or replaced, ask for a rental.

Abeel says, "The consumer should absolutely demand for the loaner car."

Experts we talked to today say whether to disable defective airbags is a question for your dealer or automaker.

There are a couple things that could help speed up the process of getting replacement parts.

Honda, Takata's largest customer, has lined up other companies to make replacement inflators. And Takata now says it is also working with other suppliers.

It also tells us today it has made 3.8-million replacement inflators so far - just a fraction of the nearly 34 million that are needed.

Monday, May 18, 2015

Understanding Express and Implied Warranties When Used Car Shopping


I recently purchased a used vehicle in Pennsylvania after the dealer promised me that the parts were “like new.” One month later, the fuel system and transmission needed to be replaced. What can I do? 

Under Pennsylvania laws, buyers and sellers of used automobiles are typically bound by the language contained in the purchase agreement. During any sale for the purchase of goods, sellers often make promises – known as “express warranties” – that may be binding upon proof of the conversation. However, in most scenarios, it is difficult for parties to prove exactly what was said at the time of purchase – prompting most courts to rely solely on the written language in the agreement.
Read more . . .


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25 Regency Plaza, Glen Mills, PA 19342
| Phone: 888-830-1474
309 Fellowship Road, East Gate Center, Suite 200, Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054

301 Grant Street, One Oxford Center, Suite 4300, Pittsburgh, PA 15219

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25 Regency Plaza, Glen Mills, PA 19342 | 309 Fellowship Road, East Gate Center, Suite 200, Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054
301 Grant Street, One Oxford Center, Suite 4300, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 | 101 Eisenhower Pkwy, Suite 300, Roseland, NJ 07068
Phone: 888-830-1474

888.830.1474